Wi-fi Network Repair

 

Complete your network with an Ethernet Junction Box or Wi-Fi boost.  Ethernet cable has been around for quite some time and is the primary way for people to connect to their cable modem, router and access the Internet . More often, it's better to complete your ethernet connections and upgrade your Wi-fi's network. Though technical support from many ISP’s (Internet Service Provider) can be a hit or miss experience. If you’ve tried everything and nothing seems to be working, it may be best to simply reach out to request a tech to come to your home and sort the issue out directly.

Improving your Wi-fi Network

If your Wi-fi network needs improving. Handyman Evans can help! There are several variables to having great Wi-fi. If it was simple, your ISP (Internet Service Provider) would do it for you. As a consumer, most ISP's tell you. You need, more speed or you need to rent more equipment to improve your coverage. Most of the times, it's as simply as purchasing the correct equipment and stop renting.

 

 

Ethernet Installations

Rj45 Ethernet connections are most common forms of cabling used in local LAN networks. It is the cable that is found to connect different devices to a router or network, creating a LAN or Local Area Network. You can design your LAN to be on a wireless network or on a wired network. Ethernet can be classified in different categories CAT5, CAT5e, CAT6, CAT6a. Many times you may hear terms CAT5 installation or CAT6 installation, which in simple terms means the installation of an Ethernet cable. Using Ethernet cables to connect your TV, computer, or other devices that use large amounts of bandwidth helps free up Wi-Fi bandwidth for other devices, like phones, tablets, or laptops. Our experts can increase your tech by combining different systems on Ethernet cables and Coaxial cables. The experts at Handyman Evans can install the perfect Ethernet options that work for your home or business. 

Common Wi-fi Problems

  • Physical distance, for obvious technical and safety reasons, Wi-Fi routers don’t have the same transmitting power as cell towers. Cheaper routers may even struggle to cover a relatively small apartment with a strong Wi-Fi signal, let alone an entire house. You can determine the reach of your Wi-Fi router using a Wi-Fi analyzer app like Net Spot.

  • Obstructions , Wi-Fi signals can be partially absorbed or even completely blocked by various obstacles and objects, including walls, duct work, furniture, home appliances, and even people. These Wi-Fi blockers have especially negative effect on 5 GHz Wi-Fi networks, because higher frequency signals don’t penetrate solid objects nearly as well as lower frequency signals.

  • Interference, Wi-Fi signals occupy the same radio frequency band of the electromagnetic spectrum actual radios, cell phones, microwave ovens, walkie talkies, baby monitors, and many other devices, all of which can interfere with Wi-Fi signals. Of course, Wi-Fi networks can also interfere with one another, a problem that’s especially common in apartment buildings and other densely populated areas.

  • Router capacity, Just like some computers can barely handle casual web browsing and some can render complex 3D objects, not all routers are equally powerful. You can’t reasonably expect a low-end router to provide reliable wireless access to the internet to a busy office with more than a dozen of employees and several fax machines, Wi-Fi connected printers, and wireless security cameras.

  • Bandwidth hugger's, sometimes, the problem isn’t with the strength of your Wi-Fi signal but with the capacity of your internet connection. Video chatting or streaming on multiple devices can bring even a strong Wi-Fi network to a crawl. For the best experience, it’s important to manage bandwidth hugger's and prevent them from stealing bandwidth from everyone else.

Which Router Is Best for You?

These days, you’ll find two types of wireless routers: traditional models and mesh network models. You’re probably familiar with the former. They’re single-unit devices that plug into a modem. They can be plenty fast, supporting even the data-hungry activities of families with dozens of internet-connected devices. But they don’t always have the range to effectively blanket a whole home in Wi-Fi, especially if you have a large or obstacle-laden layout. Mesh routers are typically packaged in a set with multiple units—a hub and one or more satellites—that work together to spread Wi-Fi into the far-flung corners of a home. If you place the hub, which plugs into your modem, near the center of your dwelling, you can shift around the satellites, which help relay the Wi-Fi signal, until you find a configuration that helps you eliminate any dead spots. So why doesn’t everyone simply choose a mesh router? They’re pricey, for one thing. The top-rated models in our ratings cost $400 to $500. By contrast, our top-rated single-unit model sells for $200, followed by one that goes for about $160. There’s also an argument to be made for simplicity. With a mesh system, you have several devices strewn about your home vs. just one with a traditional router. If you don’t actually need mesh routers, there’s no reason to invest in them.

What Does 'Wi-Fi 6' Mean?

Once you start shopping for a router, you’re likely to hear a lot of buzz about Wi-Fi 6, a new technology standard that promises faster speeds, a longer range, and better support for the ever-expanding fleet of connected devices in modern homes. Also known as 802.11ax, Wi-Fi 6 replaces the Wi-Fi 5 standard formerly known as 802.11ac, which debuted in 2013, and Wi-Fi 4 (802.11n), which dates back to 2009. The consortium that sets these standards announced a Wi-Fi 6 certification program in September 2019, and a number of routers that support the standard are now available, including three models in our ratings. But only a few internet-connected devices are currently Wi-Fi 6- compatible. (The latest Apple iPhone and Samsung Galaxy Note smartphones are examples.) Wi-Fi 4 and 5 devices can connect to a Wi-Fi 6-compatible router, but they get none of the technology’s speed benefits. Many consumers simply accept the model provided by their ISP. But internet companies usually charge a $10 to $12 monthly rental fee for the privilege, which can eclipse the price of a new router within two years. In addition to providing potential savings, buying your own router gives you far more say in the operation and security of your home Wi-Fi network. Using a simple mobile app, you can set up your router to receive automatic firmware updates. If you have a large family or frequent houseguests, our experts suggest a model that offers robust settings that let you establish parental controls and a guest network to wall folks off from certain websites and private information. 

Why Buy When You Can Rent?

Many consumers simply accept the model provided by their ISP. But internet companies usually charge a $10 to $12 monthly rental fee for the privilege, which can eclipse the price of a new router within two years. In addition to providing potential savings, buying your own router gives you far more say in the operation and security of your home Wi-Fi network. Using a simple mobile app, you can set up your router to receive automatic firmware updates. If you have a large family or frequent houseguests, our experts suggest a model that offers robust settings that let you establish parental controls and a guest network to wall folks off from certain websites and private information. 

Best Practices and Rules of Thumb

 

  • When a network connection requires maximum speed and stability, that connection should be wired. Examples are security cameras, gaming PC’s, gaming consoles and devices used for high quality entertainment like 4K video streaming.

  • When the network connection requires low latency (lag), it should always be wired.

  • If there is no feasible way of wiring the connection, then locate your Wi-Fi router and device as close to each other as possible.

  • Wi-Fi signals need to be secured properly. There are many websites dedicated to this topic, providing sound advice. 

Let Us Help

We can come to your house and evaluate you network. This means,

  • Inspect equipment

  • Inspect House Structure

  • Your Wi-fi needs

  • Network needs

  • Current Mistakes

  • Help Restructure your ISP's bill

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